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Gary Quillen's Moo Sa Black Belt AcademyGary Quillen's Moo Sa Black Belt Academy
 

21

August

Karate on the beach

Moo Sa Martial Arts & Kids Karate

We have man free family evetns throughout the year. The beach workout is by far everyone's favorite. We get to train with all our friends from other Do Jangs and then relax on the beach. Please be sure to sign up in the lobby if you are attending the workout. It helps us to have an idea of how many students will be training.

 

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14

August

Summer Karate Training

Moo Sa Martial Arts & Kids Karate

I know summer time is very difficult for people to stay on track with their training due to vacations, family visiting, and just wanting to stay outside and enjoy the nice weather. This summer I am very happy to see my students still making great progress throughout the summer. I know it is difficult to come inside and stop playing with your friends to get ready for karate class. But think about it like this, you are taking 40 minutes or sometimes an hour out of your day to do something you enjoy, and something that you will be very proud of one day. Keep your goal of Black Belt in your mind. If you want to become a black belt you are going to have to do things you don't want to do. You will have to go to class sometimes when you do not feel like it. You will have to practice saying the blocks, punches, and kicks in korean at home sometimes instead of watching spongebob haha. But this is a very importnat lesson about life, and I am glad I get to help you throughout this journey because I know that this lesson will help you throughout the rest of your life.

2

August

Stop making excuses

Moo Sa Martial Arts & Kids Karate

Picture

 

The Elephant Rope
As a man was passing the elephants, he suddenly stopped, confused by the fact that these huge creatures were being held by only a small rope tied to their front leg. No chains, no cages. It was obvious that the elephants could, at anytime, break away from their bonds but for some reason, they did not.

He saw a trainer nearby and asked why these animals just stood there and made no attempt to get away. “Well,” trainer said, “when they are very young and much smaller we use the same size rope to tie them and, at that age, it’s enough to hold them.
As they grow up, they are conditioned to believe they cannot break away. They believe the rope can still hold them, so they never try to break free.”

The man was amazed. These animals could at any time break free from their bonds but because they believed they couldn’t, they were stuck right where they were.

Like the elephants, how many of us go through life hanging onto a belief that we cannot do something, simply because we failed at it once before?

We see this a lot in our martial arts training don’t we.  Students that struggle with a particular technique or requirements to advance to the next rank start coming up with reasons why they can’t do it or won’t be able to do it instead of trying to find the solution to overcome the obstacle. “I’m too old, I’m not flexible enough, my work schedule makes it impossible, my child has ADHD and so on and so on.”
If everyone would just understand that the obstacles, the struggle and the failures along the way are actually the necessary ingredients to becoming a black belt champion it would be much easier to accept and even embrace them!
Please feel free to share this message with your friends and family. You never know who needs to read this message today!  You can learn more about us at www.moosakarate.com.

24

July

Respect in the martial arts

Moo Sa Martial Arts & Kids Karate

We teach our students that respect is treating others the way you want to be treated. We expand on this in classes but this is the basic definition. Recently we have been talking about how we should act when someone else wins a game or a contest. I ask the students how they would want everyone to act if they won a game or a contest. Of course everyone says says they would want people to cheer for them and be happy. So if we are being respectful we should cheer and be happy for other people when they win. I am working on helping my students to think about cheering and being happy when someone else does good instead of thinking they lost. Its all about how you look at things.

17

July

What the Martial Arts Teaches You

Moo Sa Martial Arts & Kids Karate

Courtesy means treating other people with kindness and consideration.

Courtesy is important in martial arts, because Martial Arts is all about respect.
Showing courtesy is treating people with respect.
It’s been said before that you can tell a lot about a person by how he treats those
who are least important to him. Think about this. If President Obama or Tom Brady (or
anyone famous) walked through the door, how would you treat them? You would
probably go out of your way to show them that you think they are important.
What about someone who’s not as famous or important? What about the people we
see every day? How do you treat them? You should treat them with the same level of
respect and courtesy. Why? Because that’s what being a Black Belt is all about. It’s
treating everyone with courtesy and consideration
 
Here is a story for you to think about.
One day, there was a New York businessman who was running late for work. As
he rushed to catch the train, he noticed a homeless man selling pencils at a table. In his
frenzy, he dropped a dollar into the cup and hurriedly stepped aboard the subway train.
On the second thought, he stepped back off the train, walked over to the homeless
man and took several pencils from the cup. Apologetically, he explained that in his haste
he had neglected to pick up his pencils, and he hoped the man wouldn’t be upset with
him. “After all,” he said. “You are a business man just like myself. You have
merchandise to sell, and it’s fairly priced.” He then caught the next train.At a social convention a
few months later, a neatly dressed salesman stepped up to the businessman an introduced himself.
“You probably don’t remember me, and I don’t know your name but I will never forget you. You are
the man who gave me back myself-respect. I was a ‘beggar’ selling pencils until you came along
and told me I was a business person.”
The lesson:
The New York businessman treated the homeless man with dignity and respect.
That’s what we mean when we talk about black belt courtesy. It’s being the type of
person that treats everyone with courtesy.
Can you imagine what kind of world this would be if everyone acted that way
toward each other?